Stetson Nash signs a scholarship to Harding University while his cousin, Charles Houston Jr., back row left; uncle, Charles Houston, aunt Linda Houston and cousin Christian Valasquez look on.
Stetson Nash signs a scholarship to Harding University while his cousin, Charles Houston Jr., back row left; uncle, Charles Houston, aunt Linda Houston and cousin Christian Valasquez look on.

Former Chief signs with D-II school

Published 4:57pm Thursday, August 1, 2013

Former Northview High School offensive and defensive lineman Stetson Nash will play football at the next level.

The 19-year-old signed a scholarship offer from Harding University, a NCAA Division II school in Searcy, Ark.

“It means that I work hard,” Nash said about the offer. “It’s a little bit of a relief.”

Nash is the latest in a bevy of former Chiefs to sign to play at the college level.

“It’s good,” Nash said. “It proves that we worked hard to get to where we are.”

Nash, who was a pass rusher and offensive tackle, said he has been informed by the Harding coaching staff that he would be playing on the defensive side of the ball at the next level. He said he hasn’t heard anything about playing time.

Nash leaves for Arkansas on Friday, Aug. 9 and said he would like to study computer science.

Coach Sid Wheatley, who along with coach Derek Marshman, traveled with Nash to Arkansas for college visits, said he feels like Harding is a good fit.

“We felt like all along he could go and do great things in the classroom as well as in the game of football,” Wheatley said. “Harding has a great coaching staff and it’s a Christian school. Stetson will be a good fit.”

Nash was flanked by his aunt, uncle and cousins as the family posed for pictures during a reception.

“I feel wonderful,” said his aunt, Linda Houston. “We raised him from age 3 to 19 and we’re very proud of him. He has made us proud.”

Nash’s uncle Charles Houston echoed those comments, adding that football was important, but it wasn’t the most important reason for getting a scholarship.

“An education comes first of all,” he said.

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