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Course surviving drought

With temperatures soaring near 100 degrees daily and it rarely rains anywhere near Atmore, the golf course at the Atmore Country Club is holding its own during this drought.

This is a peak time for tournaments as the Country Club and other organizations hold championships and scrambles in a time where water is needed to help the grass survive.

The nine-hole course that sits just off of Hwy. 31 is surviving this time without rain with the greens and fairways looking like it has rained at a normal pace.

Atmore Country Club superintendent Rodney Stewart said that it has been a battle to keep the grass alive, but added having a watering system has been a huge asset.

“The course is doing great,” he said. “We’ve been running water every night with our irrigation system. We’ve been able to maintain and keep it alive, which is the main thing.”

Despite the lack of rain, the course has been well enough for golfers take take in rounds of golf as well as for tournaments to be held.

Stewart said that the course has received some praise from golfers recently.

“We’ve received a lot of compliments in the past week,” he said. “People understand that when you don’t have water then you don’t have grass, but our the dry spots have been our rough areas because they are off of the fairways where our irrigation system doesn’t reach. It’s been a task just to keep it cut because there has barely been any growth on them.”

With roughs being out of the path of the irrigation system, Stewart and his crew at the Country Club have been fighting to keep them alive.

Sometimes they are able to get a water hose to them, but without rain, the battle is uphill, he said.

“With our roughs, if we don’t get any rain that’s pretty much it,” Stewart said. “Our rain gauge has said that we have had about one and half inches of rain in the last two weeks, so there’s really been nothing on them. There are some spots we try to run the water hose, but there’s nothing like a good rain.”