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Rotary Club honors Academic All-Stars

Those who were named as Four-Year Academic All-Stars include: Madelyn Boatwright, Christopher Gehman, Ethan Heller and Jurjevich of ACS; Noah Blue, Kajal Patel and Mikayla Spruill of Escambia Academy; and Lawrence Douglas, Abbie Johnson, Trevor Levins, Moriah McGahan, Jason Perritt, Savanna Roux, Jordan Taylor, Harmoni Till, Haylee Weaver and Madison Weber of Northview High School. | Andrew Garner/Atmore Advance

Those who were named as Four-Year Academic All-Stars include: Madelyn Boatwright, Christopher Gehman, Ethan Heller and Jurjevich of ACS; Noah Blue, Kajal Patel and Mikayla Spruill of Escambia Academy; and Lawrence Douglas, Abbie Johnson, Trevor Levins, Moriah McGahan, Jason Perritt, Savanna Roux, Jordan Taylor, Harmoni Till, Haylee Weaver and Madison Weber of Northview High School. | Andrew Garner/Atmore Advance

Escambia County’s Elizabeth Wilson and Atmore Christian School’s Nathan Jurjevich were awarded the Randolph B. Luttrell Sr. and William and Mary Grissett Memorial Scholarships at the Atmore Rotary Club’s 31st annual Academic All-Star Program last week.

Wilson and Jurjevich received a $2,000 scholarship.

In addition to announcing the memorial scholarships, the Rotary Club announced the 2016 Four-Year Academic All-Stars. Those who are four-year All-Stars receive a $750 scholarship. Three-year All-Stars receive $350; two-year All-Stars receive $250; and one-year All-Stars receive $150.

Those who were named as Four-Year Academic All-Stars include: Madelyn Boatwright, Christopher Gehman, Ethan Heller and Jurjevich of ACS; Noah Blue, Kajal Patel and Mikayla Spruill of Escambia Academy; and Lawrence Douglas, Abbie Johnson, Trevor Levins, Moriah McGahan, Jason Perritt, Savanna Roux, Jordan Taylor, Harmoni Till, Haylee Weaver and Madison Weber of Northview High School.

Students receive motivational speech

Allison Wetherbee didn’t allow her disabilities define her life.

Wetherbee

Wetherbee

The Hampton resident was the guest speaker at the Atmore Rotary Club’s 31st annual Academic All-Star Program last Thursday night at First Baptist Church.

Wetherbee was born with no arms or legs.

“My parents insisted that I live life not defined by my disabilities,” she said. “My parents wanted me to have the same opportunities as normal children.”

Wetherbee said times were different for those with disabilities in the 1970s.

“You weren’t expected to go to school with a disability,” she said.

Growing up, Wetherbee said she went to school with able-bodied kids.

“Despite of my disability, I was able to keep up with my school work,” she said.

Wetherbee uses her mouth to write and move her mechanized chair.

“You couldn’t tell the difference between my handwriting and that of a fourth grader’s,” Wetherbee said.

It was in her early life that she discovered Camp ASCCA (Alabama’s Special Camp for Children and Adults). Campers are given care through the trained staff each summer.

Wetherbee said through ASCCA, she learned to try things she didn’t know she could do.

“The camp helps push you to do something you think you can’t do,” she said. “The first time I went down a water slide I was 38 years old.”

ASCCA helped Wetherbee learn to live independently without her parents. She hasn’t lived under her parent’s roof since she was 18 years old, she said.

As she focused her message toward the seniors who were in the audience at the banquet, Wetherbee said if she could tell herself four things when she graduated from high school, they’d be to be grateful, be courageous, don’t worry or complain, and be humble and kind.

Wetherbee is the director of community relations at ASCCA, and is the author of the book, “I Was Born This Way.”

Those interested in purchasing the book can do so through Amazon.