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Looking Back: Fall Festival scheduled

Thirty years ago, in 1989, some teachers were having an impact in the lives of their students. Pat Jones, an 11th grade history teacher in Atmore, was using a unique way of reaching her students and bring to life the characters in history. She would dress the part and act in every way how the real character would have done. She based her persona on the lives of real people who had lived at the time being studied.

Now for me, someone who loves history, this would have been right down my alley. I think it must have been an interesting class.

Isiah Daily was found guilty at his trial in Escambia County. He was sentenced to life in prison for stealing a boat. Did I miss something in this report? It seems like life in prison for stealing a boat was a little bit harsh.

The T.R. Miller Tigers and the Atmore Blue Devils played each other and Miller beat Atmore 27-21.

Doug Prater, coach of the Flomaton Hurricanes, played every player on his team against the Millry

Wildcats. I am sure it was because the team won the game 41-20.

Three people were injured in a wreck on I-65 at the Atmore exit. They were taken to Greenlawn Hospital.

Students participated in a chemical spill drill with emergency personnel.

The Atmore City Council gave an okay to a sales tax of two percent and planned to finish the budget soon.

Dr. F.D. Salter was named Greenlawn Hospital staff chief.

Atmore scheduled the Fall Festival for Oct. 1, on Main Street. They promise plenty of entertainment, music, dance and good food. A highlight was to be a Man’s Legs Contest.

Sherry Martin of Brewton joined the staff of Jefferson Davis Junior College (now, Alabama Coastal Community College) as coordinator of the Displaced Homemaker, Single Parent Program.

Winn-Dixie had turkey breasts for 99 cents a pound and pork chops for $1.39 a pound.

Church’s Chicken had sausage biscuits for 69 cents each.

Builders were working hard on the $1 million expansion of Greenlawn Hospital.

It was announced that flu shots were required for children.