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Business license denied

By By Adam Prestridge
An Atmore club owner who was denied his business license during Monday afternoon’s council meeting showed his displeasure following the council’s unanimous decision to keep his Carver Street business closed.
Bobby Frye, owner of the Chick-A-Dee for more than 30 years, was denied his request for a business license to reopen his club after it was damaged by hurricanes and closed down in 2005.
Frye presented the council with a letter dated March 2, 2006 from the Alabama Alcoholic Beverage Control Board (ABC) signed by enforcement agent Leo Bedsole Jr. stating that the ABC Board has no pending actions against the Chick-A-Dee Club. He also presented them with a letter from Escambia County Sheriff’s office Capt. Tommy America stating that his office has no records for complaints at the club.
Mayor Howard Shell had a letter of his own signed by Escambia County sheriff Grover Smith and he read it to Frye, the council and others in the audience.
Frye claimed that crowds from a nearby club, Happy Days, which is now also closed, were coming onto the Chick-A-Dee property and causing the disturbances Smith was referring to in his letter.
The mayor also presented a list of 47 complaints reported from the Chick-A-Dee.
Atmore Police Department chief Jason Dean also expressed his disapproval of the club reopening, citing the safety of the residents in the area and his officers.
Shell allowed Frye to respond several times prior to the council’s vote. His last argument was why he was asked to get the building up to code during a previous proposal to the council if there was no plan of allowing him to reopen.
Frye also stated that he met with the fire marshal and building inspectors to ensure the building met code prior to Monday’s meeting.
As the council was about to take their vote, Frye spoke up one last time in his defense.
Despite Frye’s arguments, the council unanimously denied his request.
In other business, the council: